1/28/2014 – Cruise Preparations

Tasha writes: 1-P1010284 Excitement is building now that we’re almost ready to sail. By the time you read this, in fact, we’ll probably be well underway. Research time during this cruise will be split evenly between three groups: physical oceanography, seismics, and marine geology and geophysics (MG&G). Our group, the MG&G group, is comprised of the following people. Principal Investigators:

  • Chief scientist, Dr. Amy Leventer (Colgate University)
  • Dr. Amelia Shevenell and Dr. Eugene Domack (USF) 

Graduate students:

  • Michelle Guitard, Katy Smith, and Tasha Snow (USF)
  • Kelsey Winsor (OSU)

Undergraduate students:

  • Mikhaila Redovian and Kara Vadman (Colgate University)
  • David Morgan (Hamilton College)
Gene Domack shares with the students some insights gleaned from three decades of Antarctic research. Number one: Look around. This is not Antarctica.

Gene Domack shares with the students some insights gleaned from three decades of Antarctic research. Number one: Look around. This is not Antarctica.

Since our arrival in Hobart, Tasmania, we have been steadily working together to prepare the ship for the six-week research cruise. When we first stepped onto the R/V Palmer for the cruise, we found the labs completely bare; they had just been stripped down by the outgoing science crew and were ready for the incoming group of scientists to set them up in a way that best facilitates the new research demands. That would be our primary focus for the four days before the cruise.

Core lab ready for transit. The calm before the storm.

Aft dry lab ready for transit. The calm before the storm.

We began transforming the lab on Saturday, Jan 25th, by unpacking all of our supplies: sediment sampling tools, vials and bags for carrying samples, and a cornucopia of other odds and ends that together make scientific research possible. We strategically arranged lab benches to accommodate 6-meter (20ft) long jumbo kasten cores and leaving space to move around the core in the limited lab space; the process became more of a game of Tetris than lab setup.Next, we built jumbo piston core racks as well as our magnetic susceptibility (MS) system with core tracks and electronics that will be used to measure the amount of magnetic material in the cores (like magnetite). We secured all equipment and boxes for sea by bolting down all loose tables, using ropes and bungees to tie any loose items to the table legs, and fixing any drawers that do not latch properly. This will prevent drawers from ceaselessly banging open and closed, boxes sliding around the room dumping their contents, and objects becoming missiles during heavy seas.

To wrap up our preparations for the transit south, we cleaned all of the lab benches and cabinet doors for radiocarbon, first with soap and then ethanol. Cleaning will help to prevent the radiocarbon contamination of our sediment samples that would artificially alter our radiocarbon dating measurements. After being cleaned, lab benches were covered with bench paper and our facility preparations complete. Now as we set sail on our long voyage to the East Antarctic, the lab will be ready for any sort of event we might encounter.

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